OPEN ARCHIVES

                                          “ OPEN ARCHIVES ”

If you have your own website or institutional website, then that can be the first choice for depositing articles for open access. The other options can be:
(1) If you do not have a personal website or an institutional repository, you can register without any cost and then upload articles for open-access consultation on websites such as “The Archives “http
 and the articles will appear in the Google search. This archive can also be used for uploading audio and video files.
The sub-groups for the text files on The Archives are limited and the number of articles and books deposited is enormous, thus, manually searching for specific articles in this archive is very difficult except through the automated search box.
(2) In each “Health domain”, there may be specific websites which collect articles and books for open access. For example, in my areas of work (Medical Librarianship & Medical Sciences), I use “Ask Source”http://www.asksource.info/index.htm
 for sharing materials on Medical Librarianship & Medical Sciences.

Dr. N C GHATAK

          REFERENCE FROM LIBRARY CONNECT SITE

Following are 12 low cost yet high impact marketing tactics to raise the profile of your library. 

  1. 1.     Promote the library with a story on your organization’s home page and/or intranet with a tie in to National Library Week, a photo and a number of fun facts.
  2. 2.     Contact other communications outlets within your organization (company newsletter, student newspaper, etc.) and have them profile the library or library director in an article or interview.
  3. 3.     Forgive fines for the day.
  4. 4.     Invite your faculty, researchers or medical staff to a library open house and showcase recent examples of library-user partnerships.
  5. 5.     Gather all your librarians and library workers for a giant group photo in front of the library.
  6. 6.     Host a contest for students on the library’s social media channels and have them describe their best example of the library supporting their studies.
  7. 7.     Have each librarian post on social media a recent example of working with a library user.
  8. 8.     Hold a photography contest that features the library.  Display winning photos on the library website, Facebook and Instagram pages, or as screensavers on the library computers.
  9. 9.     Partner with the music or art departments to host concerts and feature art from library users, or invite employees to showcase their extramural skills.
  10. 10.  Leave the library and exhibit at other events such as a new employee orientation, health fair or sports day.
  11. 11.  Make buttons at and for the library! Button makers came up at ACRL as an inexpensive and fun way to get patrons talking about the library.
  12. 12.  Adopt a mascot and use its image on flyers, blog posts, etc. Soon the mascot will become synonymous with the library. (Or showcase your institution’s mascot in a “Day at the Library.”)

 

Good luck! And let us know if you try any of these tactics, or have great activities of your own you would like to share.

– See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/blogs/2013-04/12-fast-and-inexpensive-ways-market-your-library#sthash.Wi5JDS2r.dpuf

Please look into this document and respond soon:

http://www.itforchange.net/civil_society_input_to_the_UN_Working_Group_for_global_governance_of_the_Internet

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  1. ALTMETRICS: THE NEW SUN FOR THE RESEARCH SCHOLARS
    By- DR.N.C.GHATAK, Ex Librarian, Medical College, 88, college Street. Kolkata-700073
    Email-ncghatak30@gmail.com Blog- http://www.ncghatakadoreslife.wordpress.com
    ABSTRACT
    There is a paradigm shift in Academic, Research & Publishing & other fields of social life. It is shifted to the Online & storing huge Knowledge Data base. Scholars are now measuring scholarly activities through online beyond previous formal citations. So gathering online information, its analysis & presenting data & sharing among the Research Scholars are known as ALTMETRICS. Data through Altmetrics are of various types, such as – PDF format download, VDO, Journals, Conference papers, & from different Social media objects etc. There are so many Altmetrics websites of different sources & various specialties’, such as – PLUM ANALYTICS includes data on interlibrary loan & other specific Bibliographical data. Altmetrics uses articles data, source data & component data also. It is very helpful for the research scholars & others to get information quickly through online resources.
    KEY WORDS: — ALTMETRICS, SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES, PLUMANALYTICS, INTERNET RESOURCES.
    DATA & CODE USAGE, SCIENTIFIC DATABASES, INTERNET PROTOCOLS, HYPERLINKS, CITATIONS, WEBSITES.
    INTRODUCTION :–
    Enormous increase of scientific output to the scholars is a flood of data. Traditional metrics mechanisms for Peer Review & JIF(Journal Impact Factor) is swamping for the flood of data. Increasing scholarly use of Web2.0 tools like Databib, CiteU ike, Research Gate, Mendeley, Zotero. Twitter, Facebook , YOU TUBE & different Blogs presenting the new opportunity to create new filters . Metrics which are based on diverse set of social sources can produce broader, richer & timely assessments of current potential scholarly impact For these reasons many authors have started to call for investigation of these metrics under the banner of “Altmatrics’’
    WHAT IS ALTMETRICS?—
    ALTMETRICS means alternative measuring. Specifically it is the creation & study of new metrics based on Webs & Social networking sites for analyzing & measuring scholarships’ to serve the derived information for the need of the Library clients at the time of their need.
    ONLINE SHIFT: — There is a paradigm shift in Academic, Research & Publishing & other fields of social life. It is shifted to the Online & storing huge Knowledge Data base. For this reason the Scholars are now measuring scholarly activities through online beyond previous formal citations.

    2
    So gathering online information, its analysis & presenting data & sharing among the Research Scholars are known as ALTMETRICS.
    Data through Altmetrics are of various types, such as – PDF format download, VDO from YOUTUBE, From Journals, Conference papers, & from different Social media objects etc. There are so many Altmetrics websites of different sources & various specialties’, such as – PLUM ANALYTICS includes data on interlibrary loan & other specific Bibliographical data.
    Altmetrics uses articles data, source data & component data also. Examples are given below: —
    A – Scholarly data usage. B – Webpage views & PDF downloads. C – Scholarly References
    D – Book marking, Sharing & Recommending from Cite You Like, Databib, Zotero, Mendley, Research Gate etc.
    E- Mass Media References – Hindu, Times of India, BBC, CNN, MEDLINE & so many.
    F- Social Media mentions – You Tube, Twitter, Face Book, LinkedIn, Delicious , Elgg, & so many.
    G- Data & Code Usage – Dryad, Git Hub etc.
    H- Component Mention — Slide shares & Figure shares etc.
    AIM OF ALTMETRICS:–
    It aims to provide a forum for the dissemination of Innovative Research on the following metrics such as
     Validated new metrics based on social media.
     Tracking Science communication media on the web.
     Relation between Traditional metrics & Altmetrics including validation & correlation.
     The relationship between Peer Review & Altmetrica.
     Evaluated tools for gathering , analyzing & disseminating Altmetrics
    Various Altmetrics websites & tools have different sources & specialties’ Plum Analytics includes data on
    Interlibrary loan, & other book related & library specific data.
    Altmetrics Donut is a known site to the Research Scholars.

    3
    WHAT ALTMETRICS ACTUALLY DO? :–
    ® Measures collection performances, Impact story, & it allow users to create collections of documents using Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs)
    ® Measuring institutional Repositories performances, such as Impact story allow users to collect data from WebPages & building a collection documents from the Institutional repositories.
    ® It helps Librarians to monitor Institutional performances.
    ® Comparing relative performance of the Institutions & the Researchers — It helps to compare the social usage of the output of both the Institution & the Researcher. It allows comparison of articles by Open repository such as ORCID (Open Researcher & Contributors’ ID Repository).
    ® Creating Social Impact Statement— Social Impact of Research may be assessed by ALTMETRICS. In UK there is a change to fund Infrastructure of research Institute. It is mandatory for social impact assessment of the research concern for funding by the Government. The wider vision of ALTMETRICS can provide a good picture of the social impact of research of the Institute. The new metrics allow Academics to tell stories beyond the citations. As for example it is the evidence of work’s geographic reach & its impact in wider population of the world.
    ® Altmetrics is commercial operation & it has some free services also. Impact story services are all free service. Permission is not a need to view document’s Almetrics.
    LIBRARIANS’ ROLE: —
    Librarians’ have a great role to promote & encourage research of the Research Scholars & Academics by disseminating the necessary information for research activities. Librarian can take a very important role of the institution’s research growth.
    Tell the Research Scholars about this new field & increase your impact on the society as a whole.
    So Librarian is the BEACON to the Research Scholars.
    IMPORTANT ROLE OF THE LIBRARIAN IN VARIOUS ASPECTS: —
    Librarian is a Knowledge manager—
     From the Desktop & interconnected Smart Mobile Phone devices Information reach to the Library clients.
     Information goes to the clients through Librarian by Library holdings of both online & offline journals & books, Web articles, Social media contents etc.
    4
     Dissemination of information produced by the Internet users.
    Librarian is an EDUCATOR —
     Using social media tools empowering library users.
     Scattering knowledge with information skill to the clients.
     Using library websites to cater knowledge to the users.
    Librarian is a CONNECTOR –
    © Regularly posting information for the specific users.
    © Disseminating timely information when they demand according to their need.
    © Connecting with the media tools applications for the information services.
    © In person delivering information to the clients.
    © Within a complex information landscape interlinked with the cloud computing.
    Librarian is a facilitator & entrepreneur —
    © My Profile & application tools extends the Library’s value.
    © Library patrons are served in real time through social media information.
    © From the Library backend Librarian creates information & facilitate the information to the clients.
    © Creating & marketing information through digital media & creating spaces for information.
    © Enhancing social media culture & their collaborative tools.
    LIBRARIAN is a Lighthouse —
    © Attracting library users to the Library
    © Librarian evaluating the social needs & reviewing their needs.
    © Inspiring & involving the library users to receive the library activities’ benefits.
    © Searching resources of information & financial supports to enrich the library services.
    © LIBRARIAN blowing light through social media.
    LIBRARIAN is ready for your services. Power of the social Librarian cannot be ignored.
    5
    References :—–
    (1) A good introduction to the ambitions of altmetrics may be found at altmetrics.org/manifesto
    (2) Thelwall, M., Haustein, S., Larivière, V., Sugimoto, C.R. (2013) “Do altmetrics work? Twitter and ten other social web services”. Available at: http://www.scit.wlv.ac.uk/~cm1993/papers/Altmetrics_%20preprintx.pdf
    (3) Priem, J., Piwowar, H.A., Hemminger, B.H. (2011) “Altmetrics in the wild: An exploratory study of impact metrics based on social media (presentation)”. Available at: http://jasonpriem.org/self-archived/PLoS-altmetrics-sigmetrics11-abstract.pdf
    (4) Ebrahim, A. (2013) “Let’s be realistic about measuring impact”, http://blogs.hbr.org/hbsfaculty/2013/03/lets-be-realistic-about-measur.html
    (5) Reeves, M., (2002) “Measuring the economic and social impact of the arts: a review”,http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/media/uploads/documents/publications/340.pdf
    (6) Davis, V. (2012) “Humanities: the unexpected success story of the 21st century”, http://www.ioe.ac.uk/Virginia_Davis_2012.pdf
    (7) Radford, T. (2011) “Of course scientists can communicate”, http://www.nature.com/news/2011/110126/full/469445a.html
    (8) General Medical Council, “The state of medical education and practice in the UK: 2012”, http://data.gmc-uk.org.
    (9) According to the Nursing and Midwifery Council, http://www.nmc-uk.org/About-us/Annual-reports-and-statutory-accounts, there are 671,668 nurses and midwives who are legally allowed to practice in the UK. Approximately 350,000 are employed by the NHS. http://www.nhsconfed.org/priorities/political-engagement/Pages/NHS statistics.aspx
    (10) UK Legislation, Full text searches on April 24, 2013 on http://www.legislation.gov.uk
    (11) Wikipedia, “0 (number)”, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0_%28number%29#History
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    (15) Mail Online, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2299971/Simple-saliva-test-breast-prostate-cancer-soon-available-GP-just-5.html
    (16) The Times, http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/health/news/article3724498.ece
    (17) ImpactStory, http://www.impactstory.org/collection/dnwpb3
    (18) BBC, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21945812
    (19) The Guardian, http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2013/mar/27/scientists-prostate-breast-ovarian-cancer
    (20) Hubbard, S.B. (2013) “Vinegar: Secret to Fast Weight Loss,” Available at:http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/newswidget/vinegar-apple-cider-vinegar-folk-remedies-weight-loss/2013/07/07/id/513664
    (21) O’Keefe, J.H., Gheewala, N.M., O’Keefe, J.O. (2008) “Dietary Strategies for Improving Post-Prandial Glucose, Lipids, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Health”, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 52, No. 3, pp. 249-55 (10.1016/j.jacc.2007.10.016)
    (22)) Ostman, E., Granfeldt, Y., Persson, L., Björck, I. (2005) “Vinegar supplementation lowers glucose and insulin responses and increases satiety after a bread meal in healthy subjects”, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 59, No. 9, pp. 983-8 (10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602197)
    (23) Sutton, M. (2010) “Spinach, Iron and Popeye: Ironic lessons from biochemistry and history on the importance of healthy eating, healthy skepticism and adequate citation”, Internet Journal of Criminology, Available at: http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/sutton_Spinach_Iron_and_Popeye_March_2010.pdf
    (24) Sutton, M. (2012) “The Spinach, Popeye, Iron, Decimal Error Myth is Finally Busted”, Available at:http://www.bestthinking.com/articles/science/chemistry/biochemistry/the-spinach-popeye-iron-decimal-error-myth-is-finally-busted
    6

    (25) Rubin, G.J., Das-Munshi, J., Wessely, S. (2005) “Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity: A Systematic Review of Provocation Studies”, Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 67, No. 2, pp. 224-232 (10.1097/01.psy.0000155664.13300.64)
    (26) Eltiti, S. et al (2007) “Does Short-Term Exposure to Mobile Phone Base Station Signals Increase Symptoms in Individuals Who Report Sensitivity to Electromagnetic Fields? A Double-Blind Randomized Provocation Study”, Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 115, No. 11, pp. 1603-1608 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2072835/)
    (27) World Health Organization, Available at: http://www.who.int/peh-emf/publications/facts/fs296/en/
    (28) Eltiti, S. et al (2007) “Development and evaluation of the electromagnetic hypersensitivity questionnaire”,Bioelectromagnetics, Vol. 28, No. 2, pp. 137-151 (10.1002/bem.20279)
    (29) The Phrase Finder, Available at: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/urban-myth.html
    (30) Lewandowsky, S. et al (2012) “Misinformation and Its Correction: Continued Influence and Successful Debiasing”, Psychological Science in the Public Interest, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 106-131 (10.1177/1529100612451018)
    (31) Heath, C., Bell, C., Sternberg, E. (2001) “Emotional selection in memes: The case of urban legends”,Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 81, No. 6, pp. 1028-1041.
    (32) Berger, J. (2011) “Arousal Increases Social Transmission of Information”, Psychological Science, Vol. 22, No. 7, pp. 891-893 (10.1177/0956797611413294)
    (33) Lewandowsky, S., Gignac, G.E., Vaughan, S., (2012) “The pivotal role of perceived scientific consensus in acceptance of science”, Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, pp. 399-404 (10.1038/NCLIMATE1720)
    (34) Ecker, U.K.H., Lewandowsky, S., Swire, B., Chang, D. (2011) “Correcting false information in memory: Manipulating the strength of misinformation encoding and its retraction”, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 570-578 (10.3758/s13423-011-0065-1)
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    (36) Plos One, Available at: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0068397
    (37) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2140038/?tool=pubmed
    (38) http://arxiv.org/abs/1010.0278
    .(39) http://altmetrics.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/four-ways-to-measure-impact-copy.png
    (40) http://www.altmetric.com/article-level-metrics.php (41) http://174.143.232.228/?p=119
    (42) http://www.altmetric.com/aboutexplorer.php (43) http://www.researchtrends.com/issue-33-june-2013/the- challenges-of-measuring-social- impact-using-altmetrics/attachment/mt-fig2/
    (44) https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=cr#q=%E2%80%9Chealth+facts%E2%80%9D
    (45) http://www.gallup.com/poll/1654/Honesty-Ethics-Professions.aspx#5
    (46) http://www.Twitter.com (47) http://www.Facebook.com (48) http://www.LinkedIn.com (49) http://www.elgg.com
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